ASSOCIATION OF HUNT SABOTEURS

Campaigning for an end to all blood sports and using direct action to help save hunted animals.

OUR STAG HUNTING CAMPAIGN CONTINUES IN 2008          

 Lady Dunsaney dispute

 Lady Dunsaney dispute    

MInister John Gormley signing the END STAG HUNTING PETITION at Dail Eireann in the 90s.......now.....latest 20-12-07
Environment Minister John Gormley last night backed away from an outright ban on stag hunting.
The Green Party leader's decision to grant a restricted licence to the Ward Union Hunt proved controversial on both sides of the argument.
Mr Gormley denied he had caved in under legal pressure from the 150-year-old hunt, saying the licence issued has strict conditions meaning the actual pursuit of a stag by hounds is not permitted.
However, the move was only given a qualified welcome by both the hunt and anti-blood sports campaigners, with some pro and anti campaigners saying the restrictions would make the hunt "unworkable".
Mr Gormley, who had been minded to refuse the licence in the autumn, described the final decision as a "compromise in the best interest of the community" as he insisted he would not seek to ban stag hunting in future.
The hunt provoked widespread outrage in January when terrified children were forced to cower in classrooms when a frightened stag pursued by a pack of snarling hounds burst through the playground of the Central National School, Kildalkey, as the pupils were leaving.
The stag leapt over a wall into the grounds of the primary school, located in the middle of the village, followed by baying dogs.
The hunt described the incident as "very unfortunate," but insisted the stag was not bleeding and it was normal practice to release a stag then recapture it unhurt.
The permit issued by Mr Gormley allows the hunt to release a deer to lay a scent trail along the course of the hunt, but the deer must be recaptured before the hounds are released and the full hunt gets under way.
The Hunting Association of Ireland gave the move a "reserved welcome" but is seeking clarifications over how the restrictions will be enforced.
The Irish Council Against Blood Sports said it was hoping for a complete refusal of the licence by Mr Gormley.
But it welcomed the fact the licence issued is quite restricted and the deer will not be hunted by the dogs.
However, the council is concerned about a condition which states the deer will be driven by mounted riders "to an end point" to create a scent for the dogs to follow. The council believes this will stress the deer and pointed out it is an offence under the 1911 Protection of Animals Act to "over-drive" or "terrify" an animal.
The decision came as the Association of Hunt Saboteurs picketed Leinster House to protest at the practice of "digging out" foxes and throwing them to be eaten alive by packs of hounds.

 

HUNTING IS EVOLUTION IN REVERSE,NEWSWEEK 6-1-09

Tuesday January 6, 2009
Elephant
Photo by Dan Kitwood / Getty Images.

A new article in Newsweek explores an issue that animal advocates have talked about for years: the fact that hunting removes the largest, strongest individuals from the population. Instead of survival of the fittest, scientists are seeing "survival of the weak and scrawny."

Hunters frequently compare their role in the ecosystem to that of natural predators, some of which are disappearing throughout the world. The problem with that analogy is that, unlike hunters, natural predators target the small, the weak, and the sick. Hunters, on the other hand, tend to target the largest, strongest individuals with the largest hides, horns, tusks or antlers. Researchers now find that bighorn sheep in Alberta, Canada have smaller horns compared to 30 years ago. Red kangaroos in Australia are smaller, and fewer African and Asian elephants have tusks.

While animal rights activists oppose hunting based purely on the animals' right to live, the threat to the survival of the species is an additional reason that even hunters are concerned about:

"The hunters wish for animals with large antlers and large horns, and yet their actions are making that harder to achieve," says Richard Harris, a conservation biologist in Montana. As a hunter, Harris knows that the outcome of this trend will satisfy no one.

The article also explores the definition of "fittest." If having no tusks is an advantage because these individuals are less attractive targets to hunters, what's wrong with having no tusks? The article points out, "Tusks used to make elephants fitter, as a weapon or a tool in foraging—until ivory became a precious commodity and having tusks got you killed." In other words, in exchange for being less attractive hunting targets, these tuskless elephants had to give up their weapons and foraging tools, which makes them much less fit in other ways.

The link between hunting and tuskless elephants is unclear because of the difficulties involved with studying the effects of hunting on evolution, including the time scale and factors such as climate change and habitat loss. But if the effects of hunting on the evolution of these species is unclear, shouldn't we be safe rather than sorry? If we allow this destruction to continue while the jury is still out, we will not stop until they are on the brink of extinction. By then, the genetically strongest individuals will have been practically eradicated from the population and it will be too late.


Shock as stag eludes capture by jumping onto roof in Garristown! Fingal Independent.

Wednesday January 18 2006

A STAG is on the loose in rural Fingal after evading capture from a pack of hounds and mounted horses by legging it up the main street in Garristown and leaping off a shop roof!The Irish Red Deer was being pursued by up to 60 mounted members of the Ward Union Hunt after being set free near Palmerstown last Friday, January 13.By Donncha MacRaghnaill

A STAG is on the loose in rural Fingal after evading capture from a pack of hounds and mounted horses by legging it up the main street in Garristown and leaping off a shop roof! The Irish Red Deer was being pursued by up to 60 mounted members of the Ward Union Hunt after being set free near Palmerstown last Friday, January 13. Chairperson of the Ward Union Hunt, Oliver Russell said the de-antlered deer ’took a fairly circuitous route and came in the back of Adamstown’.

‘It arrived in Garristown near the football pitch and went down the main road,’ Mr Russell said. While Mr Russell was not there, he said he understood the deer then leaped over a wall and landed on a roof. ‘He jumped a wall but there was a drop in the ground the far side and he landed on a low roof,’ he said, saying it was probably at the back of Gough’s shop. ‘He jumped off and skedaddled away ending up beyond the graveyard,’ Mr Russell said.

‘It’s not unusual for a deer to end up on the road but it is unusual to end up on a roof but there is no talk of damage to the roof or to the deer, it was seen heading on,’ he said.Mr Russell emphasised that the hunt was licensed under the Wildlife Act and the stags remain unharmed, while an officer from the Department of the Environment is on hand to ensure that is the case.The hunters will now have to wait a month before giving chase to the deer again.

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Shock as stag eludes capture by jumping onto roof in Garristown! Fingal Independent January 2006